New Release: Polly Apfelbaum

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Hudson River Valley Nirvana | Woodblock on Handmade Japanese Paper | Edition of 15

Durham Press has completed a new series of prints with Polly Apfelbaum: Hudson River Valley Nirvana. Initially conceived in 2012, these six woodblock prints use vertical lines and a square format as a starting point from which to explore the interaction of primary and secondary colors.

Apfelbaum adopted a systematic approach to discover the possible images within a set of parameters, much like Joseph Albers’ Interaction of Color. Printed with dozens of narrow wooden blocks, the six works feature the same set of primary and secondary colors that are repeated in different arrangements, with a largely symmetrical structure applied to each image. The variation among the series showcases the unexpected results that can arise from a clear and controlled process. This compositional strategy recalls her early floor works and was an inspiration for a woven floor installation created for the Miss Dior exhibition at the Grand Palais, Paris, in 2012.

Hudson River Valley Nirvana, like many of Apfelbaum’s works, draws on diverse influences spanning art history, pop culture, and religion. The artist likened the chromatic effect of the prints to the dynamic skies captured by the Hudson River School painters. (Apfelbaum herself spends time in the region, which is a short trip from her New York City studio.) The Hudson River School is one among many of the prints’ artistic and cultural referents. They relate to Minimalism with their fixed compositional structure, but also to psychedelic and Op art. The title of the series, too, is loaded with allusions—for the artist, Nirvana refers equally to the Buddhist concept of enlightenment as it does to the Seattle grunge band. This combination of the “spiritual and punk rock” suggests that viewers are invited both to consider the nuances of the series in quiet contemplation as well as to take in the prints’ energetic colors in quick, unfettered moments. 

Hudson River Valley Nirvana and many other prints by Polly Apfelbaum are available directly through Durham Press. For more information, including pricing, please contact Gwyneth Fearnhead.

The Series, as well as new unique works by Polly Apfelbaum, is now on view in NYC at Senior & Shopmaker Gallery untill January 14th.

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NEW RELEASE: Beatriz Milhazes

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Purple Dahlia | Screenprint and Woodblock | Edition of 30

Durham Press is pleased to present two ambitious new works by Beatriz MilhazesPurple Dahlia and Mother’s Day. Both harness woodblock and screenprinting to create strong linear compositions that are a vibrant hybrid of tropical ornamentation and modernist abstraction.

Among Milhazes’s largest prints with Durham Press, Purple Dahlia measures 60 1/4 x 78 3/4 inches. While the title references a flower, geometric motifs take precedence over the work’s botanical imagery. Circles of various sizes float in the center of the print, then recede from view amid the parallel horizontal lines appearing all over the paper. The lines recall bead-like chains and rippling water. Purple Dahlia is visually dense, with nearly its entire surface covered in different patterns or shapes. The many semi-transparent inks, however, lend the composition a sense of lightness—a density more akin to wildflowers in a breezy field than a congested city street.

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Mother’s Day | Screenprint, Woodblock & Gold Leaf | Edition of 40

The narrow, vertical format of Mother’s Day—it measures 51 7/8 x 17 inches – recalls the artist’s recent sculptural work, which hangs from the ceiling and reaches down to the floor. Like Purple DahliaMother’s Day features densely configured lines, with multiple layers resembling cut-out strings of pearls and branches of leaves as well as the negatives, or “left-over” trimmings, of these shapes. By stacking, layering, and adding more components, including the diagonal plaid that appears in several places, Milhazes ambitiously adds further complexity to the art-historical sources the print obliquely references.

Purple Dahlia, Mother’s Day, and several other works by Beatriz Milhazes are available through Durham Press. For more information, please contact Gwyneth Fearnhead, [email protected]


IN THE STUDIO: PURPLE DAHLIA

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IN THE STUDIO: MOTHER’S DAY

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New Release: Hurvin Anderson | Mirror: Don’t Look Back

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Mirror: Don’t Look Back | 2015, Intaglio/Relief Collograph, Screenprint, Gold/Silver Leaf, 35 7/8 x 28 1/2 inches, Ed. 9

Durham Press is pleased to announce the completion of a new portfolio of prints by British artist Hurvin Anderson. Titled Mirror: Don’t Look Back and comprised of ten works measuring 35 7/8 x 28 1/2 inches, the portfolio combines intaglio and relief collograph, screenprint, and gold and silver leaf. It is published in an edition of nine.

In Mirror: Don’t Look Back, Anderson presents ten different adaptations of a single composition: a circle hanging slightly below center on a gray flower-patterned background. This collographic floral motif appears in each print, varying in shade and in the weight of the lines. The imagery within the circle changes more drastically throughout the portfolio. In one print, the “mirror” seems to clarify its surroundings; the circle features a sharper, more intelligible floral pattern. In another, the mirror has a transformational effect, with the luminosity of gold leaf contrasting with the relatively dull backdrop. Still others obscure the pattern encircling them, appearing as hazy orbs that Anderson has imbued with an almost otherworldly mystique.

Through repetition and subtle variation, the portfolio continues to develop themes common to Anderson’s work, such as the intersections of place and memory and familiarity and estrangement. Similar to his suite of paintings Peter’s Series—which was the subject of critically acclaimed exhibitions at the Tate Britain, London, and the Studio Museum Harlem, New York—the images in Mirror: Don’t Look Back fluctuate between abstraction and representation. Anderson employs a seemingly reticent geometric composition and largely unsentimental color scheme, but the title and the wallpaper-like backgrounds invoke connections to personal, intimate moments and to the home. The slight differences between the images further their elusive quality. It is unclear if the portfolio depicts ten mirrors that are alike, or if there is only one mirror that has been illuminated, obscured, and tarnished through the workings of time and memory.

Hurvin Anderson was born in 1965 in Birmingham, UK. He studied painting at the Wimbledon College of Art and received his Masters from the Royal College of Art in 1998. Anderson’s paintings have been exhibited in several solo shows, including “Art Now,” Tate Britain, London, 2009; “Peter’s Series,” Studio Museum Harlem, New York, 2009; “Subtitles,” Michael Werner, New York, 2011; “reporting back,” Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK, 2013; “New Works,” Thomas Dane Gallery, London, 2013; and “Hurvin Anderson: Backdrop,” Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, Missouri, 2015. Anderson has received many awards, including a residency at Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, a research fellowship at Cheltenham and Gloucester College, and the Caribbean Contemporary Arts Residency Programme, Trinidad. His work is in significant collections, such as the Saatchi Gallery in London and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. He lives and works in London.

Mirror: Don’t look Back will be on view at both the IFPDA Print Fair and Art Miami.

For pricing and availability on Hurvin Anderson’s prints, please contact Gwyneth Fearnhead, [email protected]

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New Release: James Nares |Before the Rain + Early Days

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Durham Press is proud to announce the release of two new editions by James Nares entitled, Before the Rain and Early Days. Each print measures 46 7/8 x 34 3/4 inches and is an edition of 48.

Nares’ inspiration stems from movement and gesture. Using his own crafted brushes, Nares’ work is often composed of a single brushstroke, which he will often erase and repeat until he finds a final stroke that balances both form and spontaneity.

For pricing and availability, please contact Gwyneth Fearnhead, [email protected]

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New Release: Polly Apfelbaum | Time Machine Series

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Byzantine Time Machine 4 | 2014, Woodblock Monoprint, 37 x 70 inches

Durham Press is pleased to present a new series of woodblock prints by Polly Apfelbaum. Inspired, in part, by her time spend abroad as a recipient of the 2012-13 Rome Prize, these profound works reference the artistic and craft traditions of Italy and offer fresh perspectives on many themes that Apfelbaum has explored throughout her career.

Baroque Time Machine and Byzantine Time Machine are monoprint series in two sizes, 37 x 70 inches and 79 x 79 inches, which feature powerful, vertical lines. Their titles simultaneously suggest backward and forward temporal movement, signaling historical influences and new aesthetic directions. While the compositions of the two series recall some of her rug and fabric works, the addition of black – used sparingly in some prints and frequently in others – creates a more complex color palette and gives the prints “the weight of drapery,” says Apfelbaum. Conversely, the contrast provided by black ink makes certain colors radiate with fluorescent-light-like intensity.

The fluorescence of the dramatic monoprints is further emphasized by Apfelbaum’s employment of split fountain or “rainbow roll” techniques, in which multiple colors are partially mixed to achieve a continuous gradient effect. In the Time Machines, she features rainbow rolls across elongated surfaces, while with her large, diamond monoprints – Galla Placidia, Boethius, Rusticiana, Servilia Caeponis, Aurelia Cotta, Porcia Catonis – the technique is used on much smaller woodblocks. Inspired by the intricate patterns of Cosmati floors, the matrixes for these complex diamond prints are similarly crafted with roughly 1500 hand-laid, mosaic-like blocks. The geometric and chromatic variations throughout the prints give them a dynamism befitting of their titles, most of which refer to influential Roman women. Apfelbaum’s two new editions, Emperor Twist and Empress Shout, engage a similar diamond and zig-zag pattern on a more intimate scale. Completed after the Cosmati-inspired monoprints, Twist and Shout continue to explore variations in color and shape through an “intuitive but structured process.” The development and realization of this process has resulted in a prolific year of collaboration, and this new body of work represents Apfelbaum’s most ambitious and challenging prints to date.

 

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New Release: Chitra Ganesh | Architects of the Future

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Architects of the Future | 2014, Woodblock and Screenprint, Ed. 25

Durham Press is proud to present Chitra Ganesh’s portfolio of prints, Architects of the Future.  The portfolio consists of four woodblock and screenprints in an edition of 25.  The prints measure 25 3/4 inches in height and range from 18 to 44 inches in width, and they combine between 15 and 40 impressions each.

In her drawing, painting, installation, text and film works, Ganesh excavates histories that typically have been excluded from the canons of literature and art.  She draws from a broad range of material including the iconography of Hindu, Greek and Buddhist mythology, 19th-century European portraiture and fairytales, song lyrics, as well as contemporary visual culture such as Bollywood posters, anime, and comic books.  Through a process of automatic writing, Ganesh probes these sources and narratives to uncover moments of absence and submerged desire.

In Architects of the Future, Ganesh integrates the visual language of 60s and 70s science fiction with imagery loosely inspired by the Amar Chitra Katha–a long-running comic series that portrays traditional Indian epics, history, and mythology.  The four prints form a nonlinear narrative of “unforseen desire and untimely loss” that occur in an alternate world in an imagined past and a distant future.  Within this retro-futurist universe, bodies, like time, are fluid.  They are doubled, dismembered, as well as exceeding their limits and extending into their surroundings.

By exploring bodies, space, and history through disparate visual languages, Ganesh asks her viewers to seek and consider alternate narratives of sexuality and power.  There are always untold stories trying to rise to the surface.

Chitra Ganesh is a Brooklyn-based artist who works–often collaboratively–in many disciplines, including drawing, painting, film, and text.  She holds her BA in Comparative Literature and Art Semiotics from Brown University and an MFA from Columbia University.  She is also an alumnus of Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and a 2012 recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in the Creative Arts.

Currently, she is an Artist-in-Residence at New York University’s Asian/Pacific/American Institute and the first Kirloskar Visiting Scholar in Painting at the Rhode Island School of Design. She has also been spending much of her time in India, where she has been extensively studying Indian comics and visual culture.

Ganesh’s work has been exhibited at venues such as the Brooklyn Museum, the Queens Museum of Art, the Asia Society, Bronx Museum of Art, Socrates Sculpture Park, White Columns, Momenta Art, and Apex Art in New York. International venues include the Museum of Contemporary Art (Shanghai), Devi Art Foundation (New Delhi), EVAM (Spain), Museum voor Moderne Kunst (Netherlands), ZKM (Germany), and the Prince of Wales Museum (Mumbai). She has displayed recent solo projects at the Gothenburg Kunsthalle, MoMA PS1, and The Andy Warhol Museum, and has shown her latest film at the Center for Asian American Media’s CAAM Fest.

Her work is represented in prominent international collections such as the Museum of Modern Art, and the Saatchi Collection. She is represented by Wend Norris Gallery in San Francisco. Architects of the Future is Ganesh’s first project at Durham Press.

Architects of the Future is available as a set or as individual prints directly through our gallery. Please contact Gwyneth Fearnhead for more information, [email protected]

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Studio shots of Chitra’s portfolio featuring the print “Away From the Watcher”:

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New Portfolio: Emil Lukas | Bubble-up

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Bubble-Up | 2013, Portfolio of 2 etchings and 7 screenprints, 23 3/4 x 17 inches each, ed. 35

Durham Press is pleased to announce Bubble-up, a new portfolio of prints by Emil Lukas. The portfolio consists of two etchings and seven screenprints, each measuring 22 3/4 by 17 inches. The nine prints are presented in a portfolio box and are published in an edition of 35.In Bubble-up, Lukas both recreates and re-imagines the unconventional materials and methods–including thread, larvae, bubble wrap and glass–of his acclaimed paintings and sculptures. The artist organized the prints in a three-by-three grid to give the overall composition of dots, lines, and other marks an upward and effervescent movement.Within this grid, two screen prints reference Lukas’s thread paintings, which he creates by stretching layers of threads across wooden frames. Taut, colorful lines crisscross Hum, and vertical strings accumulate into a dense mass in Curtain. Anatomy documents the wandering of larvae and ink on glass. By printing screens of the larvae’s marks, as well as several flat washes of transparent ink, the print achieves an opacity and depth similar to that of Lukas’s larvae paintings.The remaining prints in Bubble-up allude to Lukas’s distinct painting techniques while also exploring new mark-making possibilities through printmaking processes. In three additional screenprints, Lukas again used thread to produce images, but he broke away from his typical unbending lines. He created a variety of compositions, from the structured undulations of Curve to the more free-form entanglements of Blood and Release. Glass unexpectedly reinterprets an aspect of Lukas’s larvae work. Instead of exposing glass marked with ink, the screenprint subtly reveals the gentle variations in tone caused by overlapping his vacant substrate. The artist used bubble wrap to create soft ground etchings for Detail and Orb. Though they recall his bubble-wrap-cast paintings, Lukas composed the prints to highlight the individual textures and crumpled lines within each circle, or “bubble,” of the seemingly uniform utilitarian material. As with glass, thread or larvae, Lukas’s ability to accentuate the particularity of the everyday pervades this portfolio.

Art in Print wrote a wonderful review of Bubble-up in the January/February 2014 publication, click here to read the article in full. Emil has been working with Durham Press since 2001. Bubble-up is sold as a set or as individual prints, for more information please contact Durham Press.

For a behind the scenes look at Emil’s work and process in the studio, here is a great video produced by Blouin:

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On View: Polly Apfelbaum @ Lumber Room

Polly Apfelbaum is currently exhibiting in two shows.  Polly’s group show just started at the BCA Center in Vermont entitled “Evergreen Blue Shoes” and will be up until June 7th.  The show is a reference to a 60’s psychedelic rock band, continuing Polly’s exploration of counter culture and experimental artmaking.  Also on display until April 26th, Polly’s solo show at the lumber room in Portland, Oregon entitled “Color Stations Portland” will showcase her work in color field theory.  In Polly’s own words: “The 14 Color Stations are part of a larger series of Color Sessions: ‘sessions’ in the sense of musicians getting together for a number of takes, going through the score again and again, not toward some definitive version, but each take being as important as the other.” Follow this link for a review from The Oregonian.

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Polly Apfelbaum | Color Stations Portland | installation view, lumber room, Portland | image by Jeremy Bitterman, Courtesy of lumber room

The shows feature work that she created in Rome during her year at the American Academy. Polly was in the Durham Press studio this fall, just after returning from a year in Italy and was one of the 2012-13 recipients of the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize. The Rome Prize is awarded to individuals who represent the highest standard of excellence in the arts and humanities. She was very inspired by the ancient mosaics she saw during her time in Rome and travels throughout Italy. Polly used this inspiration for her most recent series which she created in October. The result are two bold new unique works on paper, entitled Emperor Justinian and Empress Theodora. The prints measure 79 x 79 inches, and are made from many different sets of blocks individually inked in hundreds of colors and painstakingly composed to create this vibrant cacophony of color.

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Noteworthy: Durham Press in NY Times + Art in America

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Photo Courtesy of the New York Times

Durham Press just returned from the IFPDA Print Fair, where we were thrilled to have the front booth. Both The New York Times  and Art in America wrote great reviews of the fair and highlighted our booth and  Empress Theodora by Polly Apfelbaum. We showed wonderful new projects by  Beatriz MilhazesHurvin Anderson,  Chitra Ganesh, Michael Heizer, Emil Lukas,and James Nares.  Mickalene Thomas’s beautiful work from last year – Sleep: Deux Femmes Noires – was also on display. Below are a few snapshots of the booth.

Thanks to all of you who came to visit and have supported us through our 25 years in business! And thank you to all of our peers at the fair who have been loyal and great colleagues – it is a warm and talented group and a wonderful association!

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New Editions: Beatriz Milhazes | Water Dreaming + Snake Dreaming

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Water Dreaming | 2013, Woodblock and Screenprint, 37 x 46 1/2 inches, ed. 40

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Snake Dreaming | 2013, Woodblock and Screenprint, 37 x 46 1/2 inches, ed. 40

Durham Press is pleased to announce two new prints by Brazilian painter Beatriz Milhazes Water Dreaming and Snake Dreaming, 2013. The prints were proofed over a two week stay this summer and will be made in an edition of forty, and released by the end of the year. Each print measures 37 x 46 1/2 inches (94 x 118 cm) and is a combination of a twenty piece woodblock and thirteen layers of silkscreen. The central flower comes from a new series of drawings that she describes as a spontaneous dialogue between recent observations of tribal art (mostly African) and Op Art from the sixties.

Milhazes is an avid printmaker. She has worked almost exclusively with Durham Press for the past seventeen years and has created an impressive body of work. Her prints have been exhibited widely alongside her paintings and collages, and documented in numerous publications. In 2012, the prints were exhibited in a show that traveled throughout Brazil organized by the SESC (Serviço Social do Comércio), and in 2011, Whitechapel, London curated an extensive print show in the U.S. at the Gallery at Windsor, which included a comprehensive catalog of the prints, their history and development.

Milhazes’s international success has been growing since her participation in the 1995 Carnegie International and her representation of Brazil in the 2003 Venice Biennale. The wide appeal of her work has captured collectors worldwide. Her work has been exhibited at Fondation Beyeler, Basel; Fondation Cartier, Paris; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon; MALBA-Fundación Costantini, Buenos Aires; Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, England; and the Birmingham Museum, Alabama. In 2014, she will open a solo exhibit at the new Pérez Art Museum in Miami.

The prints will be on view from November 6th through 10th at the IFPDA Print Fair in New York. The prints are available directly through Durham Press. Please contact Gwyneth Fearnhead for more information, [email protected]

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